Palliative Care

Mother and Daughter Embracing

Our Beacon Palliative care team aims to provide the best quality of life for a person suffering from a serious illness by providing relief from the symptoms, communication regarding his or her illness, goals of care discussions, and family support. Studies show that palliative care ensures that care is more in line with patients’ wishes. Also, emotional and spiritual needs of the patient and family are more likely going to be addressed.

Palliative care is appropriate at any age and at any stage in a serious illness. Receiving palliative care does not mean you are dying, and is not the same as hospice care. You are able to receive palliative care while receiving curative care, therefore, helping improve your overall quality of life.

A comprehensive team of physicians, nurses, therapists, counselors, chaplains, and support staff work together with patients and their families to provide medical, emotional, social, and spiritual support.

Palliative care can improve the following:

  • Reduce pain, nausea, and fatigue
  • Reduce shortness of breath
  • Improve appetite
  • Reduce depression and anxiety
  • Treat constipation
  • Improve sleep
  • Other symptoms

Palliative care can help people with the following serious illnesses or conditions, among others:

  • Cancer
  • Heart disease such as congestive heart failure
  • Lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • Kidney failure
  • Dementia
  • Parkinson’s
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
  • Neurological conditions
  • Other serious illnesses

By focusing on a person’s goals and what is important to them, the palliative care team can help improve a person’s quality of life, which includes less time in the hospital, better control of symptoms, and improved communication of the person’s wishes to family and providers. It also helps patients and their families understand their disease process.

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